Posted in #FOC, Bismark's Corner, Let's Meet You, Styles of the Cave, Uncategorized

FACE OF THE CAVE FOR THE WEEK (Appreciation of Beauty and Excellence)

The surest place to find the loveliest faces, right here, as always.


Name: Blessing Edward


State: Akwa Ibom


Likes: Honesty, Politeness
Dislike: Pride


Favourite Quote: “Never regret. If it’s good, it’s wonderful. If it’s bad, it’s experience.”


Contact: Bléssìng Blìzzy Blìñgs Edwärd |Facebook

Yes! Age is just a number!!! Get your Anti- Ageing Mask from Star MakeUpWorld/Spa at a very affordable price… Whatsapp us on 08094592460 to place orders.
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Name: Nelo Obi


Occupation: CEO & Founder at Fashionati
School: Graduate of University of Nigeria, Nsukka
Status: Married


Likes: Hard work
Dislikes: Mediocrity


Favourite Quote: “Strive to put in your best in all that you do to stand out at all times.”


Contact: Nelo Obi |Facebook

_________________________
Quote For The Week
“The question isn’t who is going to let me; it’s who is going to stop me.” – Ayn Ran

To qualify for the next Face of the cave series
*Have your profile be a clear face shot.
*Give a brief description of yourself and please make sure to include your likes, dislikes and hobbies.
*Submit them to the chatterbox team within four days from now via bbm pin- 2898fd68 or inbox Bismark Ekenedilichukwu Benson on Facebook.

Cheers to the new Face of the cave!

Share your thoughts on this week’s faces in the comment box.
We’d also love for you to stay in touch with us! The best way to keep up to date is to subscribe to Bismark’s Cave. You can do this by tapping the ‘follow’ option.
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Posted in Bismark's Corner, Let's Meet You, Styles of the Cave, ThrowBackThursday, Uncategorized

FUNNY THROW BACK THURSDAY PICTURES – Dipping Into The Archives

Here’s another exciting throwback segment. Check out these selected Cave Members today and before. Try not to laugh as you observe the huge transformation in looks & overall appearance…Lol

| Obiajulu Ugochukwu

High Glasses

| Chukwu-Ebuka Umennadi

My first passport

| Cent Anthony Chukwu

My Nokia N1 be no get flash that year

| Esther Golden Uma

My mama say I must carry my brother go school

| Joe Hiykesleo Ikechukwu

I still use material from this shirt sew my wife Weddy gown

| Chidinma Anya

Nwa Selfie

| Ezema Emerald Kalu

Abeg who take my cream

| Ebuslim Sylvester Udemezue

This Camera Man wash my picture inside Barca Chemical

| John Defiant

Admitted into College of Medicine graduated from College of Theatre Arts

| Debbie Emerald

From Nigga to Princess

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Posted in #FOC, Bismark's Corner, Let's Meet You, Styles of the Cave, Uncategorized

FACE OF THE CAVE FOR THE WEEK (Appreciation of Beauty and Excellence)

The surest place to find the loveliest faces, right here, as always.


I am Michael Chukwudi Okoye, First of his name.


I’m from Nanka, Anambra state.
I’m a writer and weaver of words. I’m currently into sports writing. I’m pretty good at what i do. sportzkick.com is the site.


Dislike?
I dislike people that are too serious and also people who are too un-serious. There should be a balance to everything.
I hate dishonest people.
I dislike people who let other people trample on them.
I dislike people celebrating mediocrity. Unless your work is excellent, i can never patronise you.
I dislike people without a sense of humour.

Likes?
I like honest people. People whose yea is yea and amen.
I like money. Yes, i’m a full blooded Igbo man.
I like rebels. I am one.
I like a good movie.
I like Ofe Nsala. In fact don’t crush on me if you can’t prepare that delicious dish.


Contact: Michael Okoye |Facebook

Yes! Age is just a number!!! Get your Anti- Ageing Mask from Star MakeUpWorld/Spa at a very affordable price… Whatsapp us on 08094592460 to place orders.
#WhyLookBeautifulWhenYouCanLookGorgeous?


Name: Mwuese Praise


Field/School: Studied English Language at Benue State University
Personality: Reserved


State: Benue
Favourite Quote: “What is worth doing is worth doing well.”


Contact: Mwuese Ter Praise |Facebook

_________________________
Quote For The Week
“True freedom is impossible without a mind made free by discipline.” – Mortimer J. Adler

To qualify for the next Face of the cave series
*Have your profile be a clear face shot.
*Give a brief description of yourself and please make sure to include your likes, dislikes and hobbies.
*Submit them to the chatterbox team within four days from now via bbm pin- 2898fd68 or inbox Bismark Ekenedilichukwu Benson on Facebook.

Cheers to the new Face of the cave!

Share your thoughts on this week’s faces in the comment box.
We’d also love for you to stay in touch with us! The best way to keep up to date is to subscribe to Bismark’s Cave. You can do this by tapping the ‘follow’ option.
_______________________
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Posted in Bismark's Corner, Let's Meet You, Styles of the Cave, Uncategorized

An Interview with Comedian – Ebuslim

Best known for taking crazy to another level, enough to keep you laughing and wondering how he does it.
He’s the one and only incredibly talented ‘Ebuslim’. Enjoy the interview.


Q – Can you briefly introduce yourself, Ebuslim:
A- I am a native of Anambra state, Nnewi local government, Osumenyi village precisely. 25 years ago, i was born into the family of Sylvester Udemezue.


Q – What kind of comedy do you do?
A – I do online comedy and stand up comedy.


Q – Can you tell us a few stand up comedy shows you’ve featured in?
A – A couple of them. I performed at the launching of Faze album. Most recently, Awka Concert which took place on February 23rd. Graced by Terry G and many other top acts.


Q – You have a huge Facebook fan base, did you realise you were funny before social media?
A – I knew I was funny because I was this jovial kid in school. I amused my mates so much that at a point, my friends would always showcase me before our teachers, for them to see how funny I could be. Then, they called on me to make them laugh. Sometimes I chose to dance or say jokes which cracked them up.
Thereafter, I grew up knowing how to easily make my friends and family, including people around me, laugh. This is what keeps me on the track.


Q – Tell us how social media has helped in putting your name out there?
A – For an up and coming comedian, doing my thing on social networks created a good platform for me. Instagram and Facebook can easily help in making one’s stuff go viral. Thousands of people get to know you and before you know it you are on that celebrity status. In my case, social networks helped in promoting me to a certain extent. Off-line, I had been to many shows where nobody knew me. But my hushpuppi comedy photos was the one that gave me the little fame that i didn’t get all these while. So I still believe in the effectiveness of online comedy.


Q – What inspires your jokes?
A – My jokes are basically a reflection of how I view things in the society. I get inspiration from what people do or what they say and how people react to things of life. Then I say to myself, “what if it is told this way?” I try to make a joke out of it, without losing the real message. Other times, I use my experiences.


Q – Any example?
A – For example, the day a bike man carried me and I had no idea of the location of where I was going to. Then he got fed up and told me to get down. So I came down and boarded another bike, but then he told his colleague that he shouldn’t carry me that I am mad I have no destination. It sounded serious, but to me, funny. Till date I share this experience in jokes and people laugh. It has become comical.


Q – When people don’t laugh at a joke, how does it feel?
A – Most times when I crack jokes and people don’t laugh, it sends a signal to me, like, “Bro you didn’t present the joke well or the people aren’t listening to you.”
I feel bad and keep on working on my skill. Not everyone would find your joke funny. I do feel bad but i don’t take it to heart. I try to improve.


Q – Do people take you seriously when you’re serious?
A – People don’t take me seriously at all. Sometimes I might say I need money and people tend to care less. I might see a fine girl like that and pour out my real intentions towards her and she would be like, “you dey use me joke abi”
Such happens but I understand that’s how they see me – a non serious person.


Q – Any major influences in the industry? (If any, mention)
A – In the industry I really appreciate the works of everyone. Nigerian comedians give their best and I found out it isn’t easy to just say this one man I love because everyone has different comedy styles. But if I were to be in a situation to choose only one person or two I would go for Bovi and I go die. These two individuals are very creative in their thoughts.


Q – What are your plans in the nearest future?
A – My future plans are on track by the grace of God. I am working with a friend currently. We plan to shoot hilarious skits that i’m really sure will make waves and make people want more from us. And also having shows annually for friends and fans all over the country to come and watch me perform – just like AY shows. Bovi’s Man on Fire, etc.


Q – In a relationship right now or not?
A – Yeah i’m in a relationship and we are good for now, hoping to take it to the next level soon.


Contacts
Phone Number | 08187933207
Facebook | Ebuslim Sylvester Udemezue
Instaagram | @officialebuslim
_______________________
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Posted in #FOC, Bismark's Corner, Let's Meet You, Styles of the Cave, Uncategorized

FACE OF THE CAVE FOR THE WEEK (Appreciation of Beauty and Excellence)

The surest place to find the loveliest faces, right here, as always.


Name: Divine Chibuzo


State: Imo


Field: Nutrition & Mgt


Likes: Honesty
Dislike: Pretenders


Favourite Quote: “There’s something about a woman with a loud mind that sits in silence,smiling,knowing she can crush you with d truth”


Contact: Deevyne Chibuhzoh |Facebook

Yes! Age is just a number!!! Get your Anti- Ageing Mask from Star MakeUpWorld/Spa at a very affordable price… Whatsapp us on 08094592460 to place orders.
#WhyLookBeautifulWhenYouCanLookGorgeous?


Name: Christian Williams Jaja


State: Rivers


Field: Biochemist/businessman


Likes: Writing, travelling, swimming, Working out.
Dislikes: Arrogance, selfishness


Favourite Quote: ‘Get up, Get on`


Contact: Christian Williams-Jaja |Facebook

_________________________
Quote For The Week
“Thinking will not overcome fear but action will.” – W. Clement Stone

To qualify for the next Face of the cave series
*Have your profile be a clear face shot.
*Give a brief description of yourself and please make sure to include your likes, dislikes and hobbies.
*Submit them to the chatterbox team within four days from now via bbm pin- 2898fd68 or inbox Bismark Ekenedilichukwu Benson on Facebook.

Cheers to the new Face of the cave!

Share your thoughts on this week’s faces in the comment box.
We’d also love for you to stay in touch with us! The best way to keep up to date is to subscribe to Bismark’s Cave. You can do this by tapping the ‘follow’ option.
_______________________
Have a story for us? Or want to place ads on the page?
Reach us on our social media handles
Facebook | Bismarks Cave
Instagram | @bismarkscaveblog

Posted in Cave View, Uncategorized

“Black Panther”: Pan-Africanism on Screen – by Eleanya Ndukwe, Jr.

Since “Black Panther” premiered in Los Angeles in January, and its theatrical release in the United States on February 16th—actually, if truth be told, even before then—till the day I saw it on the 22nd, there had been conscious efforts to dodge every “review,” “spoiler,” hash-tags with “Wakanda,” “BlackPanther” and likes. Reason: I wanted to go to the movie theatre with an “unadulterated” mind; one not coloured through the prisms of subjective and secondary analyses.

While the anticipation grew to go see “Black Panther” almost to the point of hysteria, my mind had started playing tricks on me about what I’d wear to the “occasion” as this was something out of the ordinary. My attire was definitely going to be heavily influenced by whatever cultural ideology —culture, you bet, wasn’t to be missed—I so desired.

What could be more appealing than the Abiriba cultural attire? I thought. So, out came my Ọkara from the farthest side of my box, Pop’s “Kpọmkpọm,” designed as a two- piece intertwined cultural clothing worn around the waist girdle-like in style came aboard, cuff-links followed suit, tie, my favourite white shirt, perhaps as a symbol of purity and innocence joined the clique, shoe, and the “Nnweyi Ikputu”
were all summoned. I was set—for “Black Panther.”

The excitement was building.
We got to the theatre. Pops mentioned we would be seeing “Black Panther” in “3D.” I couldn’t wait. My anticipation had bubbled over, especially with me in my Abiriba attire and an unmissable ‘heightened’ African swagger to my newly acquired footsteps.

I sat.
And it began!
It was Robin Walker who in his timeless book, “When We Ruled: The Ancient and Medieval History of Black Civilisations,” wrote about the past, historical domination of Africa during the early centuries pre-colonization, while de-bunking the western-propagated agenda of a historically- bereft Africa before the coming of “colonizers,” of which a few of its excerpts can be found here

Thus, laying credence to the works of such educationalists and historians as Chancellor Williams, Dr. Carter G. Woodson and Cheikh Anta Diop; activists as Marcus Garvey, Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X; and even literary icons as Amiri Baraka, Chinua Achebe, James Baldwin, Ngugi Wa Thiong’o and others that Africa’s history did not begin with the barbaric invasion and intrusion of colonialism, or trading of Africans but rather, as a certain sage aptly captures it, it was “interrupted” by it.

It is against this backdrop that “Black Panther” takes centre stage as A) A futuristic projection of African dominance in global politics, technology and medicine.
B.) An aesthetic representation of African livelihood and ideologies before colonialism—and some which continue to take hold of its citizens till date.

A lot of negative “reviews” have largely stemmed from the reactions to the character of the villain, Erik Killmonger. But even that, is a depiction of the “Black” man’s struggle in America: the child without a father figure, son left to find his place in a rudder-less world, the forgotten, the broken, the lost! The same way one could argue about how different world history would have read had Africa “colonised” other continents, tribes and regions. The resolution of “Black Panther’s” conflict therefore puts into perspective the fact that ambition—no matter how worthy or Pan-Africanist in quest—is not justifiable on the altar of colonialism, political and economic enslavement of “perceived” weaker nations especially while annihilating one’s own and going as far as abandoning African ideologies.

Alluringly, the richness to a work of art—visual—plays to the aesthetic introductions exhibited. If there was a need for a keen attention to details of African traditions, cultural identities, and ideologies, “Black Panther” nailed it.
And I list a few, among the numerous: Parental guide, spiritual and emotional support of the African as core, deeply embedded trait in the African family tradition stays true to this movie. Queen Ramonda remains eternally present and relevant in offering support, guide, and
even medical interventions to his son via the richest “pharmaceutical” invention known to us: Herbs. Her eternal line to T’Challa “My son, it is your time,” buttresses this point.

Much more, there is the dominant, progressive role played by other female characters from Army General and tactical, patriotic spear-wielding Okoye—whose epic line “Wakanda Forever” resonates—to super spy Nakia to tech genius Shuri taking back to the ideological empowerment format of the African heritage which produced such prominent figures as Queen Anna Nzinga, Queen Amina Sukhera of Zaria, Princess Nandi Zulu, Commander Yaa Asantewa, Queen Ahmose-Nefertari, Miriam Makeba, Queen Tiye, Queen Neithhotep and more. Thus, not pandering to patriarchal entitlements of modern society and so-called civilisation, but understanding the role, importance and relevance of the African Goddess both in the formation of life, politics, and advancement of societal goals. In this regard do we see “ancient” civilisation as acknowledging the woman as the God of creation, survival, and dominance; and reinforcing the need for feminism, gender equality and most importantly in this new age, women empowerment!

The costume designing in “Black Panther” would bring this truth even further. The famous drapes usually gracing Nigerian attires are not missed; the lip and ear plate modifications of the Surma and Mursi body tribes of Ethiopia; the Ndebele neck rings and laces largely
synonymous with the South Africans and Zimbabweans; the Ethiopian and Sudanese tribes-inspired body tattoos; Maasai-inspired ornaments and dressings of the Tanzanian and Kenyan people; the Mgbedike masks of the Igbo, Eastern Nigeria tribe; the Lesotho blankets; the “otjize” paste reminiscent of the Northwestern Himba people of Namibia; the Tuareg scarfs of the North and West Africans;
the Agbada largely worn by those of North and West Africans; the Dogon attires of the Mali people; the tiny, multi-coloured neck beads worn by Kenya’s Turkana people etc.

Just as unique as the costumes are, the languages utilised in “Black Panther” enchant even more. Language as an extensive form of communication/dissemination of information in the movie heightens the consciousness of Pan-Africanism in “Black Panther” using Nsibidi and the Xhosa languages.

Nsibidi is comprised of both logo-graphic symbols, as words and morphemes, and an ideographic set-up, as such, a representation of ideas and concepts known to the indigenous Ejagham (Ekoi) people in present day Cross River State, Calabar, Nigeria. It was adopted by their Efik, Ibibio, Anang and Igbo neighbours (Abiriba, Bende, Igbere,
Edda, Arochukwu, and Afikpo) through the interpersonal relationships bordering on socio-economic integration and by a stretch of political domination cum communal clashes.

According to archaeological findings of ceramic artefacts with such inscriptions on them, Nsibidi dates between at least 4000-5000 BCE; totally devoid of Arabic and Latin precursors. However, some unique Ikom, Nigeria monoliths with Nsibidi writings were found to date back to 2000 BC.
This makes it one of the oldest written languages in world history and emphatically refutes the idea that oral tradition was the only means of communication employed by Africans —Nigerians in this case—before the advent of the British colonising monsters.

As imperialism and slavery took root in Africa, through the Atlantic Slave Trade, Nsibidi was exported by the African slaves to the Caribbean where it developed into the anaforuana and veve symbols and can be found till date in Cuba, Venezuela, Jamaica, Haiti, and even Brazil. While recent history claims that the Nsibidi language and writing is almost going extinct, it has been recognised too that some clans and tribes in Eastern Nigeria, mainly the Efik, Ibibio, Ohafia, Abiriba, Arochukwu, Ebonyi and even Southern reaches of Cameroon still use this esoteric, mystical language as a communication format through the societal fraternity known as Ekpe.

Xhosa—the endearing “click click language,” so named for its ‘click’ consonants’ at pronunciation—is a Bantu language spoken by over 19 million people in Southern Africa. Nations like Zimbabwe, Zambia, Tanzania, Botswana, Namibia, and Lesotho are heavy users.
Archaeological findings reveal that the Xhosa-speaking people have lived in the Eastern Cape region since the 7th century AD as descendants of the Bantu, originally from present day Cameroon and Nigeria while another record posits that Xhosa has existed since before the 16th century.

Juxtaposing the usage of the Nsibidi and Xhosa languages in “Black Panther” and relative global history, one can note, regrettably, that in colonialism and western imperialism, Africa lost one of the most unifying factors of civilisation—language. Just as we did with spirituality, cultural practices etc. “The white man is very clever…he has put a knife on the things that held us together and we have fallen apart,” the eternal novelist, essayist and poet Chinua Achebe aptly
captures this vanquishment in his classic “Things Fall Apart.”

As with the language culture being a unique trait of mother-land Africans, so is art. Africans are first recognised and portrayed on the basis of their unique art ideologies.
These identities are portrayed through the traditional garbs, rhythmic fusion of murals covering backgrounds across most scenes, exploring the richness of African art, its place in pre colonial times, continuous relevance and consciousness. Speaking of “Art,” “Black Panther” zeroes in on the failures of Africa while highlighting the massive exploitations perpetrated by the West. For instance, the scene where Killmonger appears in a London art gallery depicts the Art plunders that have become the bane of African Art the world over. I wrote about this problem some time ago and can be found here

Critically, one must factor in the notion of rejecting “immigrants” into “Wakanda” as pandering to racism. As such, would Africa be a dominant continent for all forms of civilisation if she rejected/rejects migration, border crossings and voyages from “foreigners?” This, “Black Panther” credibly dealt with, with T’Challa acknowledging the role to be played by his “nation” in treating an ailing CIA agent Ross while waging war against his cousin Killmonger. Subliminal in tone, but equally forceful in portrayal is how it depicts the effects of the madness of current global crises of wars, persecutions, and terrorisms
vis-à-vis migration, asylum requests and the need for borders of nation-states to be opened to refugees or refusing to give aides through the sheer boundless possibilities of the symbolic resource “Vibranium”—representing the massive, vast, limitless potentials of Africa ‘s numerous natural resources.

Does this justify and fulfil the promises of its needs or merits? T’Challa answers in one of the credits scenes: “Wakanda will no longer watch from the shadows….We will work to be an example of how we, as brothers and sisters of this earth, should treat each other. Now, more than ever, the illusions of division threaten our very existence. We all
know the truth: more connects us than separates us. … We must find a way to look after one another, as if we were one single tribe.”

Perhaps as a rebuttal to the foreign policies of the major world powers in their respective foreign policies or at least, an allegory for the recognition of the self-acclaimed “greatest nation on earth’s” failure, T’Challa advises, “In times of crisis the wise build bridges, while the foolish build barriers.”
It might interest you to replace “barriers” with “walls,” for better and easier relativity.

If building “bridges” is T’Challa’s goals, then on its metaphoric base dwells the platform on which the greatest act of dehumanization, the Atlantic slave trade, transpired— the ocean. Africans were traded across the American continent as lesser animals to face even greater acts of inhumanity for the sake of racism. African ancestors bled, had their bodies torn limb from limb, raped, slaughtered, lynched for the bloodthirsty spite of their western plunderers. Some entertained hope—no matter how infinitesimal—of a future where they would be treated or at least regarded as equal, or maybe more than lesser animals. They kept the faith.

But a few select souls would rather embrace death as their ultimate redemption than be sold into slavery. Those were the Igbos, of present day South-eastern Nigeria. It was May 1803. At the Dunbar Creek on St. Simons Island, Glynn County, Georgia, they seized their ship, overpowered and drowned their captors, and as a verified account of the tragic event recounts, led by their spiritual leader with
raised vocals on a war-like song of courage; of defiance; of homecoming, marched to the sea, hand in hand, forever in brotherhood’s solidarity, they committed one of the largest mass suicides in America’s history of slavery. The historic site is known today as Igbo Landing.

Erik Killmonger seems to allude to this historic happenstance in his final moment when he quips, “Bury me in the ocean with my ancestors that jumped from the ships, ‘cause they knew death was better than bondage.”
Constant recurrence in “Black Panther” is the minor theme of communication between the living and the dead—a major African ideology about the place of deep connection between those still in the physical realm and their ancestors. For guidance. For inspiration. For peace. Thus, Killmonger finds peace in reconnecting with his ancestors which had eluded him in life, but not in death.

Not to forget though, the directorial prowess and tight-knit script written by Ryan Coogler and Joe Robert Cole; the cast starring Chadwick Boseman, Michael B. Jordan, Andy Serkis, Lupita Nyong’o, Danai Gurira, Martin Freeman, Daniel Kaluuya, Angela Bassett, Forest Whitaker, Letitia Wright, Winston Duke; and the awe-laden, Pan-African-inspiring costumes designed by the super creative Ruth E.
Carter more than delivered. My number is on a few personalities from the “Black Panther” cast and crew to win next year’s major awards.

In the end, “Black Panther” is one of those classics that cannot be exhausted in one “review” as every scene, sequence, character’s arc, major and minor themes all build on to something bigger. Something almost unexplainable.
Something complete justice would arguably never be done to by way of exposé.

This is my opinion. Whatever you make of “Black Panther,” there is no denying the fact that, in this Information Age, the consciousness for Pan-Africanism is taking a more forceful root and “Black Panther” has only added to this movement.
Shamefully, the only failure I can perceive of “Black Panther” is perhaps the irrepressible tragic feeling that it may not be enough to arouse the slumbering political “leaders” littered all over Africa who clearly lack the political will to bring the “futuristic” potentials of “Wakanda” to fruition.

But like Somali-Canadian artiste K’naan expresses hope in his audacious “Waving Flag,” I patiently wait for that fateful day, when I will be able to say assuredly, like Okoye, “We are Home!”

P.S.: all pictures featured on this piece were sourced from different websites on the internet. Therefore, all copyright laws are duly acknowledged with no intent, whatsoever, to infringe on the creative rights of the original owners.

#WakandaForever #BlackPanther #Africa #TheNewMind

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Posted in #FOC, Bismark's Corner, Let's Meet You, Styles of the Cave, Uncategorized

FACE OF THE CAVE FOR THE WEEK (Appreciation of Beauty and Excellence)

The surest place to find the loveliest faces, right here, as always.


Name: John Domadi


State: Enugu
Profession: Song writer, fashion illustrator, writer


Likes- All the fruits of love
Dislikes – All the fruits of negativity


Favourite Quote- “Your free will can either make or destroy you”


Contact: John Domadi Chukwu |Facebook

Yes! Age is just a number!!! Get your Anti- Aging Mask from Star MakeUpWorld/Spa at a very affordable price… Whatsapp us on 08094592460 to place orders.
#WhyLookBeautifulWhenYouCanLookGorgeous?


Name: Adejoke Deborah Oyeleye


Occupation: Owner at Pischon TOTAL Beauty Concept
Field/ School: Computer science / University of Applied Sciences and Management


Likes: I love travelling around the world and meeting new people


Favourite Quote: “You don’t have to find the perfect person, before you experience the perfect love.”


Contact: Adejoke Deborah Oyeleye |Facebook

_________________________
Quote For The Week
“Show me someone who has done something worthwhile, and I’ll show you someone who has overcome adversity.” – Lou Holtz

To qualify for the next Face of the cave series
*Have your profile be a clear face shot.
*Give a brief description of yourself and please make sure to include your likes, dislikes and hobbies.
*Submit them to the chatterbox team within four days from now via bbm pin- 2898fd68 or inbox Bismark Ekenedilichukwu Benson on Facebook.

Cheers to the new Face of the cave!

Share your thoughts on this week’s faces in the comment box.
We’d also love for you to stay in touch with us! The best way to keep up to date is to subscribe to Bismark’s Cave. You can do this by tapping the ‘follow’ option.
_______________________
Have a story for us? Or want to place ads on the page?
Reach us on our social media handles
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Instagram | @bismarkscaveblog

Posted in Cave View, Uncategorized

Dealing With Breakups by Oge Chi

Being in love is a beautiful feeling. Your head is up in the clouds and life seems to have an extra colour. The grasses look greener and the singing of birds are more melodious.
Then, suddenly, everything crashes like a pack of cards ; your dreams of a happy forever-after, and you are left with feelings of rejection, despondence, dejection and depression.

Break-up periods are always tough. The heart is broken and many negative thoughts come to mind. According Lucia O’Sullivan of the University of Brunwick, break-ups or heartbreaks are a leading cause of psychological stress and suicide among young people. According to the study, it turns out break-ups were implicated in 28 percent of the time over a four month period.

The truth is, we are prepared for everything in a relationship except one, heartbreaks and break-ups.
Most people can hardly handle break-ups or heartbreaks. Some have no clue on how to go about the aftermath but here is a list of things one can do to manage and recover from break-ups and heartbreaks.


1. Cry. Let the tears flow, do not bottle up the frustration and bitterness you feel. Unburden yourself. A study on the benefits of crying shows that it is self-soothing , regulates emotions and reduces stress as well as activates the Para-sympathetic Nervous System(PNS) which aids relaxation. Crying is a natural response to emotions, not a sign of weakness. Suppressing tears can cause some psychological stress.


2. LET GO…it is the past, do not let the hurt and bitterness hinder the present or the future. Psychologically, break-ups or heartbreaks can be demeaning, however, do not give room to the feeling of rejection, depression or dejection. Don’t let it take your mirth. Do not blame yourself or anyone . Do not revenge, it will only complicate issues.

3. Talk to someone about it, maybe a parent or a friend.

Talking can ease off the feeling of rejection. Human beings are social animals and depend on one another for comfort, remember the saying, a problem half shared is half solved ? However, it is important to be cautious of whom you confide in.

4. Do not keep a tab on your Ex. There is usually this feeling of wanting to know what he or she is up to using social media platforms.

This is unhealthy and will only worsen the way you feel especially if your Ex has moved on with another person.


5. Build your self-esteem.
Break-ups can take a toll on one’s self-esteem They are usually accompanied by feelings of rejection and thoughts of not being good enough. It is important to know your worth and that the lost of a partner does define you value.

6. Plan and re-plan on how to live your life with him/her out of the picture. Your relationship is just one part of your life, there are a lot of other things to live for.

Set up goals, e g, in your career, and strategize on how to achieve them. This may not be a walkover , especially when there are shared dreams , promises and memories but try…It’s not the end of the world. Keeping busy takes your mind away from so many things.

7. Hangout with understanding friends in places that will not bring back memories of your past relationship.

It is important to let your friends know the situation of things, that you are on your path to healing, and want to forget, so they don’t raise issues that may remind you. You can also join a support group of people who have similar experiences . Have fun.

8. Attend events, don’t shut yourself out from the world. Have a discussion class, or read book . Explore your talents. Assign those times you usually spend with your former partner to other things, academics, hobbies, etcetera, you won’t miss him or her at those times.

9. Stay away from romantic relationships for a while after break-ups. Give yourself time to heal before going into another one. It can be hard and you may want to prove your worth and to your Ex , that you have moved on without him or her, however it is important to understand that you have nothing to prove. Work on your raw emotions to ensure you aren’t carrying an extra luggage into your new relationship.

10. Give yourself the opportunity to love again. Do not hate or avoid potential partners. Do not generalize, your EX is just one out of many and people differs. Just be cautious.

Finally, break-ups are natural happenings. People can always leave. Learn your lessons, see break-ups and heartbreaks as one of life’s experiences that equip you for the better and live on. Love will find you again.
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